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Collaborative learning teams

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Basic Member
+2
1 year ago
Collaborative learning teams are said to attain higher level thinking and preserve information for longer times than students working individually. Based on our collective experiences, why is this so?
Basic Member
1 year ago
In my experience it really depends on what and how students are working collaboratively. I do think collaboration stimulates so many differnt parts of the brain, and that helps students with different learning styles learn, remember material, and think about things in different ways.

Last updated: 1 year ago

1 year ago
I believe it's because it shifts the cognitive load onto them. They have to own the learning when they talk about it and apply it. It also empowers them to explore the topic and decreases the feeling of being led by the nose through learning. They are released to be curious and engage in topics and with each other authentically.

It's not always easy or effective. If collaboration happens naturally, you're lucky. But when modeled how to do it effectively in the classroom, it frees the teacher up in ways I didn't think possible. By the end of the school year, its really nice to just move from group to group and listen to them push and challenge each other to bring out their best work and their strongest questions.

Students need to be taught how to listen without interrupting, respond respectfully with I agree/disagree with..., because...

Ask clarifying questions and repeat back what they heard instead of jumping to conclusions.

Identifying roles and rotating between them. Allowing students to give each other positive feedback in the form of affirming what another student did that helped or was effective, and turning negatives into suggestions or wants based on standards or impact to help students advocate for their needs or challenges to resolve conflict without getting the teacher involved.

I did this with third graders for the past five years and over that time I learned that it must be taught; it's not natural, and that all students can learn to do it if they feel safe and trust you as the teacher to be consistent in your supports.

Last updated: 1 year ago

Full Member
+5
1 year ago
Quote from Ehealey
In my experience it really depends on what and how students are working collaboratively. I do think collaboration stimulates so many differnt parts of the brain, and that helps students with different learning styles learn, remember material, and think about things in different ways.

I also think that the gains that students get from collaboration can be great, however, it depends on how well the students can work together. Sometimes the collaboration can be distracting and could prevent learning. There must be guided instruction at least at the lower levels.
Basic Member
+2
1 year ago
Quote from Ehealey
In my experience it really depends on what and how students are working collaboratively. I do think collaboration stimulates so many differnt parts of the brain, and that helps students with different learning styles learn, remember material, and think about things in different ways.

Thank you for sharing your insights with us in this thread.
Basic Member
+2
1 year ago
Quote from irishfunk.mcginnis@gmail.com
I believe it's because it shifts the cognitive load onto them. They have to own the learning when they talk about it and apply it. It also empowers them to explore the topic and decreases the feeling of being led by the nose through learning. They are released to be curious and engage in topics and with each other authentically.

It's not always easy or effective. If collaboration happens naturally, you're lucky. But when modeled how to do it effectively in the classroom, it frees the teacher up in ways I didn't think possible. By the end of the school year, its really nice to just move from group to group and listen to them push and challenge each other to bring out their best work and their strongest questions.

Students need to be taught how to listen without interrupting, respond respectfully with I agree/disagree with..., because...

Ask clarifying questions and repeat back what they heard instead of jumping to conclusions.

Identifying roles and rotating between them. Allowing students to give each other positive feedback in the form of affirming what another student did that helped or was effective, and turning negatives into suggestions or wants based on standards or impact to help students advocate for their needs or challenges to resolve conflict without getting the teacher involved.

I did this with third graders for the past five years and over that time I learned that it must be taught; it's not natural, and that all students can learn to do it if they feel safe and trust you as the teacher to be consistent in your supports.

Thank you for sharing you experience with us.

I believe that these skills can and need to be retaught as the students progress through the years.
Basic Member
+2
1 year ago
Quote from Profe Moreno
Quote from Ehealey
In my experience it really depends on what and how students are working collaboratively. I do think collaboration stimulates so many differnt parts of the brain, and that helps students with different learning styles learn, remember material, and think about things in different ways.

I also think that the gains that students get from collaboration can be great, however, it depends on how well the students can work together. Sometimes the collaboration can be distracting and could prevent learning. There must be guided instruction at least at the lower levels.

I agree that guided instruction is essential even at the secondary level.
1 year ago
In my experience, I believe that the best learning happens when children are actively involved in a project. Collaborative learning is an approach that encourages students to create groups and work together to solve a given problem.

Collaborative learning helps to develop their social skills. Collaborative learning makes students with different backgrounds, race, or up bringing, to work together. They come together in a setting that maybe would not be possible if it were not for collaborative learning. In order to solve a projectís given problem, children need to communicate. They are able to hear different opinions and learn more about different cultures. The collaborative learning methodology is ideal for children that have difficulties in a social setting.

Collaborative learning helps them to learn from their peers.Generally, people have different skills, passions, and knowledge. In a small collaborative group, when a question is raised, different students can have different answers and children can learn new things from one another, but also understand different perspectives.

Collaborative Learning helps to build trust. In order to achieve a goal, students need to work together. They can work together without trusting each other, but for an effective collaboration and to reach a common goal, they need to learn to trust each other.

Collaborative Learning help them to engage in learning. In a small group setting, each student has the opportunity to express her or his ideas. Being able to do so, and being heard can give the feeling of importance and value. The learning experience becomes more fun, and students are eager to learn more.

Collaborative Learning helps them to gain confidence. As students work as a team, they also receive more support, therefore gain confidence. Collaborative learning can help shy students express themselves more.
Full Member
+5
1 year ago
Students benefit from each other's strengths. The success of one learner is helpful to the rest of the team. I have often found that a student can explain things better to another student in terms that they get.

CLs are also helpful in that the students learn life and work skills involved in team work.

They are responsible for their learning, but also for that of the others in group
Full Member
+5
1 year ago
Quote from Susan S.
Students benefit from each other's strengths. The success of one learner is helpful to the rest of the team. I have often found that a student can explain things better to another student in terms that they get.

CLs are also helpful in that the students learn life and work skills involved in team work.

They are responsible for their learning, but also for that of the others in group

Unfortunately students are not always willing to take that responsibility on their own, thus they need guidance from their teacher to make it happen.
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