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How do you motivate your students to read?

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Basic Member
+3
5 years ago
So how can we motivate our students to read? That's a question we are constantly asking and readdressing. Some of the ways that have proven effective is to take the time to get to know your students and their interests. This is hard to do with 60-100 kids on the middle school level. Most recently I've been giving my students weekend summaries to complete with guided questions. I ask questions and respond to their comments and show that I read what they wrote. I give them back promptly and keep them. After only a few weeks I know who's reading a different book each week and who is writing the EXACT same summary. It doesn't take very long and I have a better grasp of where the breakdown is on comprehension. I've seen such improvement in the level as well as the number of kids turning in these assignments! What do you do to motivate your readers?
Full Member
+7
5 years ago
I teach 2nd & 3rd graders and although at this age they generally are intrinsically movtivated to read I do have some mostly boys that do not like it at all. I have found that reading different types of books aloud helps them identitify what genre they like best and I have had students beg me to read the books themselves after I am done with it.
Basic Member
+3
5 years ago
Thanks!
Basic Member
+4
5 years ago
This year, our school lost the Accelerated Reader program.  AR used to be a big motivator for our students to read.  However, we have found that the motivation from AR was purely extrinsic (in the form of students earning points and prizes for high scores on comprehension tests) - therefore, with this program being eliminated our students are no longer "motivated" to read.  

I have spent a lot of my own money building a diverse classroom library filled with books of different genres, and on various reading levels in the hopes of encouraging my students to read.  Although students go to the bookshelves frequently, they generally flip through the pages of books quickly just looking at pictures.     

I also tried using the Book It program (sponsored by Pizza Hut), but only a few students participated in this program.  I have tried reading logs as a way to track the number of books students read.  I set up a reward system based on the number of books read each grading period.  This worked for a while, but lost its "intrigue" by the middle of the year.

I am still searching for the best way to intrinsically motivate students to read.  As someone who has always loved reading, this is a real struggle for me.  I would appreciate any suggestions.
Basic Member
5 years ago
This summer my school started a reading program for our kids called myOn maybe that's something you might want to take a look at for your students.
Basic Member
5 years ago
Quote from Linda Barber
This summer my school started a reading program for our kids called myOn maybe that's something you might want to take a look at for your students.

Last updated: 5 years ago

Basic Member
+3
5 years ago
I actually presented my middle schoolers with research on WHY teachers require reading over the summer. I teach in a lower SES school. I presented them with information about the summer slide and how neighboring more affluent districts require more of their students and there is less of a regression in such areas. We charted how over time this would effect students comparatively. This seemed to work. They expressed that no one has ever explained it to them like that.
Basic Member
+7
5 years ago
I think it's a problem area across the country. We use Accelerated Reader and I have also used Book-It in my class. Nothing seems to motivate them. it is one of the reasons our school has so many struggling readers.
Basic Member
5 years ago
I teach HS social studies and have a 4th grade daughter, so this is a very pertinent question!  I have been doing partner-reading at home with my daughter, letting her choose the book, this summer.  Mixed success...I think she is just more kinestetic and gets bored quickly.

The challenge I face at school is a class set of textbooks, so I can't assign reading from that source outside of class time.  I am hoping we have online access by the time August rolls around. I am going to try Curriculet to assign some guided reading and analysis for my students.
Basic Member
+3
5 years ago
Quote from Natalie Alexander
I think it's a problem area across the country. We use Accelerated Reader and I have also used Book-It in my class. Nothing seems to motivate them. it is one of the reasons our school has so many struggling readers.

I have mixed feelings with AR. I am an in-class support teacher, so I see varying levels of engagement from class to class. Some students simply choose books based on AR points. This is sad. These students rarely look at the reading level nor the content. It's no wonder why they aren't interested in the book. One of my fabulous co-teachers, who is simply amazing, is always reinventing the wheel. She has her students create monthly reading goals and reflect on them. They are have a GoodReads account... and I've actually seen some 8th graders, who have just graduated, update their accounts with either progress or a book review since the summer began! (Amazing because they are no longer being "forced" to read) She is constantly reorganizing her library so it is "fresh", doing book talks, encouraging students to share books with classmates, and publicly celebrating success... no matter how small. We search high and low at public libraries to help our students find that "just right" book. I just feel like more needs to be done, to reach a larger percentage of our struggling readers.
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