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Independent and Dependent Variable Lesson ideas

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Basic Member
+3
6 years ago
I teach 6th grade science and each and every year my students seem to have a harder and harder time grasping this concept even though it is not new. This year I have made this one of my Smart Goals. I was wondering if anyone has had success with this concept and would be willing to share. I have tried SpongeBob Variables, but they were more interested in discussing episodes of the show rather than making the connections.
Full Member
+6
6 years ago
Quote from Mistie Williams
I teach 6th grade science and each and every year my students seem to have a harder and harder time grasping this concept even though it is not new. This year I have made this one of my Smart Goals. I was wondering if anyone has had success with this concept and would be willing to share. I have tried SpongeBob Variables, but they were more interested in discussing episodes of the show rather than making the connections.

When teaching my 7th grade students variables, I usually start with "experiment stories" for the students to read and pick out the variables. We then do some basic labs, such as a ball drop from decreasing heights. They collect and record the bounce heights. The variables are identified and the information is graphed. I have students identify the variables in labs throughout the year. Many times, the first question on their papers asks them to identify the independent and dependent variables. I find that the more often the students are asked to identify the variables, the more proficient they become. There have also been times that I have had them write their own "experiment stories".

Last updated: 6 years ago

Basic Member
+3
6 years ago
Thank you Veronica! Those are great ideas! I will have to try the stories idea and the ball drop idea is simple yet should be something that they will enjoy. I appreciate the help.
Basic Member
+6
5 years ago
Hi Mistie,

I have stressed over this too. I think the more meaningful and relative it is to the students the likely hood it may stick with them. Everytime we do a lab we complete an EDD. Im hoping by by the end of the year. It will be easier for the kids to identify.
Basic Member
5 years ago
Hello,

Here's a sample lesson:

http://k12free.com/independent-and-dependent-variables/

Best regards,

Jamal
Basic Member
+8
5 years ago
Quote from Lisa Boiteau
Hi Mistie,

I have stressed over this too. I think the more meaningful and relative it is to the students the likely hood it may stick with them. Everytime we do a lab we complete an EDD. Im hoping by by the end of the year. It will be easier for the kids to identify.

What is an EDD?
Basic Member
+10
4 years ago
Quote from Mistie Williams
I teach 6th grade science and each and every year my students seem to have a harder and harder time grasping this concept even though it is not new. This year I have made this one of my Smart Goals. I was wondering if anyone has had success with this concept and would be willing to share. I have tried SpongeBob Variables, but they were more interested in discussing episodes of the show rather than making the connections.

When discussing the episodes, or afterwards, you might try having the students create a vocabulary activity using key words from their reflections. That way, they are using what is comfortable to them. Once the students have become more at ease, branch out to your "intended" goal. Hope this helps. :)
Basic Member
+4
3 years ago
Quote from VeronicaB
Quote from Mistie Williams
I teach 6th grade science and each and every year my students seem to have a harder and harder time grasping this concept even though it is not new. This year I have made this one of my Smart Goals. I was wondering if anyone has had success with this concept and would be willing to share. I have tried SpongeBob Variables, but they were more interested in discussing episodes of the show rather than making the connections.

When teaching my 7th grade students variables, I usually start with "experiment stories" for the students to read and pick out the variables. We then do some basic labs, such as a ball drop from decreasing heights. They collect and record the bounce heights. The variables are identified and the information is graphed. I have students identify the variables in labs throughout the year. Many times, the first question on their papers asks them to identify the independent and dependent variables. I find that the more often the students are asked to identify the variables, the more proficient they become. There have also been times that I have had them write their own "experiment stories".

This is great information! Thank you for sharing!!
Basic Member
+2
2 years ago
Quote from Colettedavis
Quote from Mistie Williams
I teach 6th grade science and each and every year my students seem to have a harder and harder time grasping this concept even though it is not new. This year I have made this one of my Smart Goals. I was wondering if anyone has had success with this concept and would be willing to share. I have tried SpongeBob Variables, but they were more interested in discussing episodes of the show rather than making the connections.

When discussing the episodes, or afterwards, you might try having the students create a vocabulary activity using key words from their reflections. That way, they are using what is comfortable to them. Once the students have become more at ease, branch out to your "intended" goal. Hope this helps. :)

Thank you for this awesome suggestion.
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