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Shelly Sanchez Terrell

Shelly Sanchez Terrell is a teacher trainer, instructional designer, and author. She has been recognized by various notable entities, such as the ELTon Awards, The New York Times, and Microsoftís Heroes for Education, as a leader and visionary for teacher-driven professional development, education technology, elearning, and mobile learning.

She is the co-founder of the #Edchat movement, the Reform Symposium Global E-Conference, and The 30 Goals Challenge for Educators. She has trained teachers and taught learners in over 100 countries and has consulted with organizations such as UNESCO Bangkok, The European Union aPLaNet Project, Cultura Iglesa of Brazil, the British Council in South East Asia, and more.

Shelly hosts American TESOLís Free Friday Webinars and shares regularly via TeacherRebootCamp.com, Twitter @ShellTerrell, Facebook, and Google+. She is also the author of Learning To Go, Byte-sized Potential, and The 30 Goals Challenge for Educators published by Routledge.
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Some of Shelly Sanchez's Webinars

Presented by Shelly Sanchez Terrell Tuesday, September 27, 2016
3:00 - 3:30 PM EDT
Presented by Shelly Sanchez Terrell Tuesday, August 2, 2016
10:00 - 10:30 AM EDT
Presented by Shelly Sanchez Terrell Tuesday, July 26, 2016
11:00 - 11:30 AM EDT

Meet SimpleK12 Trainer Shelly Sanchez Terrell

Q & A with Shelly Sanchez Terrell

If you weren't in education, what do you think you'd be doing and why?

I would have been a beach bum and Iím still aiming for this career change ;-)

When you were a kid, you wanted to be a ______? Why?

A kid and never grow up! I still have that Peter Pan syndrome. When youíre a kid you donít worry so much about what people think. You live your life by simple rules, like playing and enjoying what you love to do. You are sensitive about hurting those you love and you are full of curiosity. I never want to lose these traits.

What's your idea of happiness?

Being with Rosco, my pug, on a beach, listening to Maria Callas or Nina Simone and enjoying the gift of life.

Twitter changed my life because:

I wouldnít have met so many incredible friends who I have been able to visit and learn from. Since joining Twitter, I have traveled so much more to meet my online friends and have had incredible learning experiences.

What are your favorite books and authors?

I love many books and authors. I spend a lot of time reading. A few of my favorites are The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes, A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole, Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, A Different Drummer by William Melvin Kelley, and The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs by Carmine Gallo.

The teacher who had the biggest impact on me and why:

My father, who taught me that education could break generational cycles and perpetuate new cycles and that is always my aim as an educator. My fatherís goal in life was that his five daughters would all graduate from college and break the poverty cycle that had existed for generations. All five of us graduated from college and now my nieces and nephews are preparing to attend college.

The biggest problem with K-12 education is:

That the ones most impacted by education policy (students, parents, and teachers) are not the ones who get to create the policy.

Do you have a motto you live by?

I have many mottos I live by. Love the life you live, live the life you love, by Bob Marley; Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle, by Plato; Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do, from the "Apple, Think Differently Ad;" To surrender dreams - this may be madness. To seek treasure where there is only trash. Too much sanity may be madness - and maddest of all: to see life as it is, and not as it should be! From Miguel De Cervantes' Don Quixote of La Mancha; Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goals, by Henry Ford.