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Library Media Specialists, Unite!

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Full Member
+10
4 years ago
I have a question for my fellow library media specialists out there. Do you ever find that you're used more as a "techie" than as a teacher? For example, if a bulb on a projector goes out, if a teacher can't get their grades to sync, if the DVD player jams, are you the one they call, or do you have a tech department? We do have a tech department (non-teachers) but I still seem to be the first line of defense, even though I teach 25 classes a week.

Secondly, how closely does your tech department work with you? Do you have admin rights on the computers, to update, to add software, etc? Or is that off limits to you, since you're a teacher, not a tech.

Basic Member
+9
4 years ago
I am not the library media specialist, but I am our building's technology liaison. I am also a third grade teacher. The tech liaison position is new this year and is a stipend position. I mostly handle integration of technology in instruction. There's a fine line between what I handle and what our LMC director handles, but I know she does handle the projector lights as well. We do have an IT department, if we have issues that neither she or I handle, we submit an online request and software, hardware issues are handled through IT. She does not have override authority, only IT does.
Basic Member
+8
3 years ago
I know you made your original post almost a year ago, but this is still a relevant topic. The school-level tech contacts in our district are paid a stipend. In many cases, that person is also the media specialist. However, this year, all of our library aide positions were cut, making it difficult to respond to requests for help at any time other than before/after school. Not good for those emergency type situations. I think that it is important for media specialists to be current on technology - hardware, software, web resources, apps, etc. However, I don't want my ability to "do things" to take away from my capability to serve my students' needs.
Full Member
+2
2 years ago
We have an ETSS (educational technology support specialist) who is the first go to person when there is a tech issue.  However, she is spread out among 10 schools and is not always available. Myself and another tech savvy teacher are usually next in line.  I can't always drop what I am doing to help right at the moment, but I help when I have the first opportunity.  I think it is so important in our position that we help when we can.  We want to be seen as important and necessary.

As far as having access, I think it might depend on who your ETSS is in our county.  All the ETSS's I've worked with have given me admin rights on the computers in the media center at least so that I can do what I need to do to them.  I also have the apple ID and password to be able to install apps on any of the school iPads. Classroom teachers don't have access to this information.

I feel that it is important to note that in my county, media specialists do get a small pay increase that is supposed to compensate for the extra duties we have.  $200 a year doesn't really go that far, but at least the county acknowledges that we have duties beyond checking in/out and shelving books.
Basic Member
+4
2 years ago
I am so happy to hear about a district that values its library media specialists! That's rare.  You're right, $200 doesn't go far but the acknowledgement is important.
Basic Member
+10
2 years ago
Quote from Mary Creek
I have a question for my fellow library media specialists out there. Do you ever find that you're used more as a "techie" than as a teacher? For example, if a bulb on a projector goes out, if a teacher can't get their grades to sync, if the DVD player jams, are you the one they call, or do you have a tech department? We do have a tech department (non-teachers) but I still seem to be the first line of defense, even though I teach 25 classes a week.

Secondly, how closely does your tech department work with you? Do you have admin rights on the computers, to update, to add software, etc? Or is that off limits to you, since you're a teacher, not a tech.

I have always considered the librarian/media specialist as a teacher. However, an added positive is that colleague is quite resourceful with media, along with our technologist. :)
Basic Member
+10
2 years ago
Quote from Diana Lawsky
I am so happy to hear about a district that values its library media specialists! That's rare.? You're right, $200 doesn't go far but the acknowledgement is important.

Much appreciation for all library media specialists. An increase in monetary allotment for the upkeep and materials needed is important, especially since the entire school is served by you.
Basic Member
+10
2 years ago
Quote from jnase1
We have an ETSS (educational technology support specialist) who is the first go to person when there is a tech issue. ?However, she is spread out among 10 schools and is not always available. Myself and another tech savvy teacher are usually next in line. ?I can't always drop what I am doing to help right at the moment, but I help when I have the first opportunity. ?I think it is so important in our position that we help when we can. ?We want to be seen as important and necessary.

As far as having access, I think it might depend on who your ETSS is in our county. ?All the ETSS's I've worked with have given me admin rights on the computers in the media center at least so that I can do what I need to do to them. ?I also have the apple ID and password to be able to install apps on any of the school iPads. Classroom teachers don't have access to this information.

I feel that it is important to note that in my county, media specialists do get a small pay increase that is supposed to compensate for the extra duties we have. ?$200 a year doesn't really go that far, but at least the county acknowledges that we have duties beyond checking in/out and shelving books.

Roles modify. Please know, however, that you are appreciated as a person, a teacher, and a specialist. Hats off to you. :)
Basic Member
+9
2 years ago
Awesome! Thank you for sharing:)
Basic Member
+10
2 years ago
Quote from Mrs. Arndt
Awesome! Thank you for sharing:)

Fantastic sharing. Much excitement to pass along to others. :)
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