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Homework vs. No Homework Is the Wrong Question

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Full Member
+8
6 months ago
What is your opinion about giving homework or not?

https://www.edutopia.org/blog/homework-vs-no-homework-wrong-question-maurice-elias
6 months ago
Quote from Mariel Gomez de la Torre
What is your opinion about giving homework or not?

https://www.edutopia.org/blog/homework-vs-no-homework-wrong-question-maurice-elias

I think that students need to be free in the afternoon to explore reading, creating things or play. They have completed their 8 hours of their studies. In Finland, they do not give homework to kids. Instead, the idea is for kids to be kids and enjoy.
Full Member
+5
6 months ago
What happens to those students who do not utilize their time in school to absorb and apply knowledge at their fingertips? A few problems to reinforce what is learned from the day to actually see if they actually can apply the learned concept or concepts of the day is that too much? How is 6 to 8 hours enough time for all that is required to be taught to students? Does this NO Homework involve not writing or reading but game playing, unlimited computer/game playing and staying up until 1, 2, or later in the morning? I see many households with no limit of time for free time or unstructured time. Many state that they wish to have the time after school for family time and really is it time where family sits down together and truly spends quality time together?

My own children had homework, as did I growing up. They played sports, scouts, CCD, volunteered and other community involvement. My children had time to ride their bike, play on the swing, go swimming and more. Time was structured to make sure all fit in along with quality sit down time for meals, conversations and a regular bedtime. My children have succeeded in life to rank in the top 5% of their class to attend quality universities with scholarships. My children are not among a minority group for our neighborhood is quite the same. So, I say yes to homework.
6 months ago
Quote from deckhardt
What happens to those students who do not utilize their time in school to absorb and apply knowledge at their fingertips? A few problems to reinforce what is learned from the day to actually see if they actually can apply the learned concept or concepts of the day is that too much? How is 6 to 8 hours enough time for all that is required to be taught to students? Does this NO Homework involve not writing or reading but game playing, unlimited computer/game playing and staying up until 1, 2, or later in the morning? I see many households with no limit of time for free time or unstructured time. Many state that they wish to have the time after school for family time and really is it time where family sits down together and truly spends quality time together?

My own children had homework, as did I growing up. They played sports, scouts, CCD, volunteered and other community involvement. My children had time to ride their bike, play on the swing, go swimming and more. Time was structured to make sure all fit in along with quality sit down time for meals, conversations and a regular bedtime. My children have succeeded in life to rank in the top 5% of their class to attend quality universities with scholarships. My children are not among a minority group for our neighborhood is quite the same. So, I say yes to homework.

I guess it should work otherwise Finland kids will not be ranking number 1. I think children need to have time for independent reading, arts, creativity and fun. I am specific saying about K-6. For middle school I think it should be something short that target specific thing that a child needs. I also believe homework should be personalize to the need of the kids.

Great discussion! Each schools have different realities as well.
Full Member
6 months ago
Quote from deckhardt
What happens to those students who do not utilize their time in school to absorb and apply knowledge at their fingertips? A few problems to reinforce what is learned from the day to actually see if they actually can apply the learned concept or concepts of the day is that too much? How is 6 to 8 hours enough time for all that is required to be taught to students? Does this NO Homework involve not writing or reading but game playing, unlimited computer/game playing and staying up until 1, 2, or later in the morning? I see many households with no limit of time for free time or unstructured time. Many state that they wish to have the time after school for family time and really is it time where family sits down together and truly spends quality time together?

My own children had homework, as did I growing up. They played sports, scouts, CCD, volunteered and other community involvement. My children had time to ride their bike, play on the swing, go swimming and more. Time was structured to make sure all fit in along with quality sit down time for meals, conversations and a regular bedtime. My children have succeeded in life to rank in the top 5% of their class to attend quality universities with scholarships. My children are not among a minority group for our neighborhood is quite the same. So, I say yes to homework.

I totally agree with you Deckhardt. The students I work with live in near poverty, spend a lot of time on activities out of school (sports/playing video games) yet do not have time to read at home. I am investigating the concept of Generation Z. Most of my students parents resent homework being sent home. Most of my students do not complete the basic spelling or math review and their scores reflect that. Most have very little stamina or attention span to focus even during mini lessons. I am trying to learn how to meet the students needs and the few parents who get upset over no homework have children who can attend to lessons and have an attention span that is far stronger than the majority of their classmates.
Full Member
6 months ago
Quote from Gomez de la Torre-Cerfontaine, Mariel Ines
Quote from deckhardt
What happens to those students who do not utilize their time in school to absorb and apply knowledge at their fingertips? A few problems to reinforce what is learned from the day to actually see if they actually can apply the learned concept or concepts of the day is that too much? How is 6 to 8 hours enough time for all that is required to be taught to students? Does this NO Homework involve not writing or reading but game playing, unlimited computer/game playing and staying up until 1, 2, or later in the morning? I see many households with no limit of time for free time or unstructured time. Many state that they wish to have the time after school for family time and really is it time where family sits down together and truly spends quality time together?

My own children had homework, as did I growing up. They played sports, scouts, CCD, volunteered and other community involvement. My children had time to ride their bike, play on the swing, go swimming and more. Time was structured to make sure all fit in along with quality sit down time for meals, conversations and a regular bedtime. My children have succeeded in life to rank in the top 5% of their class to attend quality universities with scholarships. My children are not among a minority group for our neighborhood is quite the same. So, I say yes to homework.

I guess it should work otherwise Finland kids will not be ranking number 1. I think children need to have time for independent reading, arts, creativity and fun. I am specific saying about K-6. For middle school I think it should be something short that target specific thing that a child needs. I also believe homework should be personalize to the need of the kids.

Great discussion! Each schools have different realities as well.

Maybe in Finland there is respect for educators and families are actively engaged in parenting. I agree with the concept that homework should be personalized. How to do that strategically is a very important aspect of HW design.
6 months ago
Quote from Hupa2nd16
Quote from Gomez de la Torre-Cerfontaine, Mariel Ines
Quote from deckhardt
What happens to those students who do not utilize their time in school to absorb and apply knowledge at their fingertips? A few problems to reinforce what is learned from the day to actually see if they actually can apply the learned concept or concepts of the day is that too much? How is 6 to 8 hours enough time for all that is required to be taught to students? Does this NO Homework involve not writing or reading but game playing, unlimited computer/game playing and staying up until 1, 2, or later in the morning? I see many households with no limit of time for free time or unstructured time. Many state that they wish to have the time after school for family time and really is it time where family sits down together and truly spends quality time together?

My own children had homework, as did I growing up. They played sports, scouts, CCD, volunteered and other community involvement. My children had time to ride their bike, play on the swing, go swimming and more. Time was structured to make sure all fit in along with quality sit down time for meals, conversations and a regular bedtime. My children have succeeded in life to rank in the top 5% of their class to attend quality universities with scholarships. My children are not among a minority group for our neighborhood is quite the same. So, I say yes to homework.

I guess it should work otherwise Finland kids will not be ranking number 1. I think children need to have time for independent reading, arts, creativity and fun. I am specific saying about K-6. For middle school I think it should be something short that target specific thing that a child needs. I also believe homework should be personalize to the need of the kids.

Great discussion! Each schools have different realities as well.

Maybe in Finland there is respect for educators and families are actively engaged in parenting. I agree with the concept that homework should be personalized. How to do that strategically is a very important aspect of HW design.

As an ESL teacher, I have seen over the years a lot of homework that students do not understand, then I have to help them to do it. I think if you want to give homework, it should be something that the child can do it by themselves.
6 months ago
Quote from Hupa2nd16
Quote from deckhardt
What happens to those students who do not utilize their time in school to absorb and apply knowledge at their fingertips? A few problems to reinforce what is learned from the day to actually see if they actually can apply the learned concept or concepts of the day is that too much? How is 6 to 8 hours enough time for all that is required to be taught to students? Does this NO Homework involve not writing or reading but game playing, unlimited computer/game playing and staying up until 1, 2, or later in the morning? I see many households with no limit of time for free time or unstructured time. Many state that they wish to have the time after school for family time and really is it time where family sits down together and truly spends quality time together?

My own children had homework, as did I growing up. They played sports, scouts, CCD, volunteered and other community involvement. My children had time to ride their bike, play on the swing, go swimming and more. Time was structured to make sure all fit in along with quality sit down time for meals, conversations and a regular bedtime. My children have succeeded in life to rank in the top 5% of their class to attend quality universities with scholarships. My children are not among a minority group for our neighborhood is quite the same. So, I say yes to homework.

I totally agree with you Deckhardt. The students I work with live in near poverty, spend a lot of time on activities out of school (sports/playing video games) yet do not have time to read at home. I am investigating the concept of Generation Z. Most of my students parents resent homework being sent home. Most of my students do not complete the basic spelling or math review and their scores reflect that. Most have very little stamina or attention span to focus even during mini lessons. I am trying to learn how to meet the students needs and the few parents who get upset over no homework have children who can attend to lessons and have an attention span that is far stronger than the majority of their classmates.

I think it will be better to have a remediation class for those students than giving something that they have difficulty to do it on their own. I think they should have time for independent reading or review facts to help later in math. My believe is that if they couldn't do it in your class, what makes think that they could do it on their own. I will prefer to have a club in the afternoon where you will help them to develop other skills that it will help them in class.
Full Member
6 months ago
Quote from Gomez de la Torre-Cerfontaine, Mariel Ines
Quote from Hupa2nd16
Quote from Gomez de la Torre-Cerfontaine, Mariel Ines
Quote from deckhardt
What happens to those students who do not utilize their time in school to absorb and apply knowledge at their fingertips? A few problems to reinforce what is learned from the day to actually see if they actually can apply the learned concept or concepts of the day is that too much? How is 6 to 8 hours enough time for all that is required to be taught to students? Does this NO Homework involve not writing or reading but game playing, unlimited computer/game playing and staying up until 1, 2, or later in the morning? I see many households with no limit of time for free time or unstructured time. Many state that they wish to have the time after school for family time and really is it time where family sits down together and truly spends quality time together?

My own children had homework, as did I growing up. They played sports, scouts, CCD, volunteered and other community involvement. My children had time to ride their bike, play on the swing, go swimming and more. Time was structured to make sure all fit in along with quality sit down time for meals, conversations and a regular bedtime. My children have succeeded in life to rank in the top 5% of their class to attend quality universities with scholarships. My children are not among a minority group for our neighborhood is quite the same. So, I say yes to homework.

I guess it should work otherwise Finland kids will not be ranking number 1. I think children need to have time for independent reading, arts, creativity and fun. I am specific saying about K-6. For middle school I think it should be something short that target specific thing that a child needs. I also believe homework should be personalize to the need of the kids.

Great discussion! Each schools have different realities as well.

Maybe in Finland there is respect for educators and families are actively engaged in parenting. I agree with the concept that homework should be personalized. How to do that strategically is a very important aspect of HW design.

As an ESL teacher, I have seen over the years a lot of homework that students do not understand, then I have to help them to do it. I think if you want to give homework, it should be something that the child can do it by themselves.

I think homework is such a controversial issue now a days, yet was a given when I was a kid. I see both sides to the issue, when considering homework I always want it to be something they can do individually, I don't want parents or siblings to have to help. If a student can't figure out the homework I want to know some specificsdid they bring home notes to help them? Did they attempt it and get stuck, or did they just decide in advance it was too hard. If they can't get it done, I want to know in the morning before school starts, so I can get a feel if I need to reteach or if the student needs to use the resources provided. I think homework is important though to assess indepenedent understandingbut alsotime management. I assign week long homework to my students. They receive it on Monday and it is due on Friday. It is very hard to get done well on Thursday night, but most of the students learn to split the work up and some time managment skills. Sometimes it is not always about the content but the life skills also.
Full Member
+2
6 months ago
Quote from lthompson@rankin98.org
Quote from Gomez de la Torre-Cerfontaine, Mariel Ines
Quote from Hupa2nd16
Quote from Gomez de la Torre-Cerfontaine, Mariel Ines
Quote from deckhardt
What happens to those students who do not utilize their time in school to absorb and apply knowledge at their fingertips? A few problems to reinforce what is learned from the day to actually see if they actually can apply the learned concept or concepts of the day is that too much? How is 6 to 8 hours enough time for all that is required to be taught to students? Does this NO Homework involve not writing or reading but game playing, unlimited computer/game playing and staying up until 1, 2, or later in the morning? I see many households with no limit of time for free time or unstructured time. Many state that they wish to have the time after school for family time and really is it time where family sits down together and truly spends quality time together?

My own children had homework, as did I growing up. They played sports, scouts, CCD, volunteered and other community involvement. My children had time to ride their bike, play on the swing, go swimming and more. Time was structured to make sure all fit in along with quality sit down time for meals, conversations and a regular bedtime. My children have succeeded in life to rank in the top 5% of their class to attend quality universities with scholarships. My children are not among a minority group for our neighborhood is quite the same. So, I say yes to homework.

I guess it should work otherwise Finland kids will not be ranking number 1. I think children need to have time for independent reading, arts, creativity and fun. I am specific saying about K-6. For middle school I think it should be something short that target specific thing that a child needs. I also believe homework should be personalize to the need of the kids.

Great discussion! Each schools have different realities as well.

Maybe in Finland there is respect for educators and families are actively engaged in parenting. I agree with the concept that homework should be personalized. How to do that strategically is a very important aspect of HW design.

As an ESL teacher, I have seen over the years a lot of homework that students do not understand, then I have to help them to do it. I think if you want to give homework, it should be something that the child can do it by themselves.

I think homework is such a controversial issue now a days, yet was a given when I was a kid. I see both sides to the issue, when considering homework I always want it to be something they can do individually, I don't want parents or siblings to have to help. If a student can't figure out the homework I want to know some specificsdid they bring home notes to help them? Did they attempt it and get stuck, or did they just decide in advance it was too hard. If they can't get it done, I want to know in the morning before school starts, so I can get a feel if I need to reteach or if the student needs to use the resources provided. I think homework is important though to assess indepenedent understandingbut alsotime management. I assign week long homework to my students. They receive it on Monday and it is due on Friday. It is very hard to get done well on Thursday night, but most of the students learn to split the work up and some time managment skills. Sometimes it is not always about the content but the life skills also.

Rethinking Homework - Alfie Kohn article

http://www.alfiekohn.org/article/rethinking-homework/

"After spending most of the day in school, children are typically given additional assignments to be completed at home. This is a rather curious fact when you stop to think about it, but not as curious as the fact that few people ever stop to think about it."
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