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Behavior Management

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Basic Member
11 months ago
I have not been on here for quite some time. The 2014-2015 school year was my first year teaching full time. The class was wonderful! When school started I found out I was pregnant with my third child. It was a great year but I was exhausted. I thought this year would be better, but with the baby and 2 older kids in activities I was completely overwhelmed, exhausted, and swimming in papers. I thought this year would be quite easy since I only had 7 boys in the classroom and 12 girls. I was wrong. I dreaded going to school and leaving the baby to deal with some of my students.

I teach 3rd grade at a Catholic school. I tried a clip chart but it seemed I would forget to move students up (reward good behavior) but I always moved students down. I did start using a Think Sheet towards the end of the year, this seemed to help some. I plan on using this again.

Please give tell me how you deal with bad behavior in the classroom.
Full Member
11 months ago
Hi!

I can only imagine how overwhelmed you must be! I don't know how you do it. Here is a link that I found very insightful. I hope you find it helpful as well: http://www.smartclassroommanagement.com/2010/12/04/8-things-teachers-do-to-encourage-misbehavior/#prclt-azaXMv21
Full Member
11 months ago
Wow! Sounds like you did have quite a year! Here are a few things that I have done that may also help you. I work very hard at the beginning of the year to train students in all of my procedures and expectations. I also had a class this year that was very trying, so I also added the use of "Class Dojo" app. The kids loved earning points and behaviors improved quickly. The last thing that I've really tried focusing on lately that seems to really help is to give praise to those students who are doing the right thing, it seems to get the class back and on task or attentive faster than anything else I've tried. Enjoy the summer break and your family!
Full Member
+2
11 months ago
I can empathize with you. Class Dojo is an extraordinary tool for behavior management. The most important thing is to explain thoroughly, the first day of school, what are your class objectives and the consequences (good and bad) of behavior. Be consistent! Make the parents active participants. Reward the good behavior by praising, and why not some candy!
Full Member
+8
11 months ago
Quote from Mangielo
I can empathize with you. Class Dojo is an extraordinary tool for behavior management. The most important thing is to explain thoroughly, the first day of school, what are your class objectives and the consequences (good and bad) of behavior. Be consistent! Make the parents active participants. Reward the good behavior by praising, and why not some candy!

I loved Class Dojo as well. I found that I was not the best at the individual points so I made a group goal. If we all got 10,000 points there was a cool reward. Then we set another goal. They worked together to get as many points as possible. I found myself just doing the quick give whole class points a lot. It worked amazing!!!
Full Member
9 months ago
I really like your idea of having a group goal, rather than focus on the individual points. That makes it a collaborative effort!
Full Member
+1
9 months ago
I like the idea of a group goal! I teach Kindergarten and find it difficult to be able to use Class Dojo everyday as there are always so many "fires" to put out!
Full Member
9 months ago
I will try that this year!
Basic Member
+3
9 months ago
The ClassDojo app does have built in goals that you can use in the classroom. The goals are set at 50 pts, 100 pts and 500 pts. I found with my second graders that the 50 pts was perfect for the beginning of the year and 500 pts for the end of the year. However I also alternated from daily goals at the beginning of the year to weekly goals by the end. Gotta plan for building patience! :)
Full Member
1 month ago
I work really hard to positively praise my students and to get them to realize what their behavior is actually saying about them (Actions speak louder than words). I have one student in particular this year that is obviously the center of the universe at home so he is quite the handful in class (I teach Kindergarten). I know he CAN be smart so if I can't catch him doing good, I will at least tell him what his behavior is saying and that I don't like it when he doesn't tell the truth about himself. I say something like, "why do you want people to think you are not smart? Your actions right now make it look like you don't know this information/how to behave when we all know you are very smart. It really hurts me that you want others to think a lie about you. Let's change our behavior to show the truth about you." With this child, it doesn't always achieve the outcome that I want for very long, but there has been a big change when I look back to the beginning of the year. But it usually is quite effective for my other students. Most don't realize what their behavior and body language is saying.
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